Friday 9th January 2015

The Friday group is back in action again after the Christmas break and it was a lovely bright day for being out in the garden. We talked about plans for the garden during the forthcoming year which will involve developing a shrubbery at the bottom of the garden, the remains of the pine tree will come down and a new shed will going in. A number of people commented on early daffodils that are blooming now in Brighton parks – these are likely to be Narcissus ‘Rijnveld’s Early Sensation’ which flower in January.

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Plant identification:

  • Clematis cirrhosa ‘Freckles’  is a large evergreen climber with dark green leaves. The cup shaped flowers are heavily speckled with maroon  and appear during late autumn, winter or early spring. They have good silky seed-heads. It is part of the Ranunculaceae family which includes buttercups. In the Garden House this clematis grows up the willow arch.

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  • Lonicera fragrantissima, winter flowering honeysuckle, is a bushy deciduous shrub that grows to 2m, with simple leaves  and pairs of very fragrant cream flowers in winter and early spring. It is good to plant it among shrubs that provide good interest over the summer months as it can look insignificant when not in flower.

shopping

  • Cornus stolonifera ‘Flaviramea’ or yellow bark dogwood is a medium sized deciduous shrub with yellow stems that are at their brightest in winter. It will grow well in almost any soil but likes wet conditions.

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  • Cornus alba ‘Siberica’ or Siberian dogwood has slender red stems that become bright crimson in winter. For best stem colour cut the stems back hard in March/April to about 2-3″ and apply a thick mulch.

cornus

It is also a good time to take hardwood cuttings from cornus.

Activities in the garden this week:

  • Cleaning the greenhouse

Sally

  • Pruning the rose along the fence behind the compost

Hilary

  • Potting on peas and spinach plants and sowing parsley
  • Seed sorting
  • Pruning the hawthorn tree

Ann and S

 

 

 

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